Long Island Fight for Charity, Title Insurance New York

Hallmark Abstract in the News at BoxingScene.com

Long Island Fight for Charity and Michael Haltman of Hallmark Abstract Service

Hallmark Abstract Service President Mike Haltman, in his role as fighter and fundraiser with the Long Island Fight for Charity, appears in the newest edition of BoxingScene.com!

Approached by Tom Gerbasi, Senior Editor at BoxingScene.com, Michael shared some of his background in the world of boxing and rationale for participating in this years 10th Anniversary Edition of the Long Island Fight for Charity.

If after reading the article, you are inspired to either sponsor the Fight for Charity or simply make a donation to the cause, please visit a prior article at The Hallmark Abstract Sentinel here and scroll down to the bottom for links to donate or contact Michael at mhaltman@hallmarkabstractllc.com.

‘A Boxer is Born in Long Island’ by Thomas Gerbasi

If you’re a fan of boxing, there was inevitably a time when you watched a great fight and said “I could do that.” Or if you weren’t so bold, maybe you just whispered to yourself that you wanted to do that, that for one moment, you wanted to see what it was like to put on the gloves, step between the ropes, and engage in a pure one-on-one combat session with someone else.

For most, that thought quickly fades away when you realize a) you might have to get off the couch or b) that as fun as it is to hit, it’s not so much fun getting hit back.

As far as being a fan, Long Island’s Mike Haltman is like most of us, having been stung by the boxing bug early on. In his case, it was when he was working as a bellhop at Grossinger’s resort, which doubled as the training home to an endless list of world-class boxers.

“Back then the fighters all came up there to train, and I was around it,” he said. “There was a bar across the street that had a boxing club in it, so I went there, and I fooled around a little bit.”

That was it. For the moment. After his brief brush with the sweet science, he remained a fan, but he also got on with life, going to school and to work, and eventually becoming president of the title insurance company, Hallmark Abstract Service. He also married and had three kids, and as far as boxing was concerned, that was something for Saturday nights on television or to be practiced on the heavy bag and speed bag in his basement. That was at least until he was at a networking function and overheard someone talking about an event where local businessmen and women competed in the ring to raise money for charity.

“I heard a guy talking about it, he told me what it was and I said I wanted to do it,” said Haltman.

“When I heard about this it rekindled a desire. I have a heavy bag and speed bag in my garage, I’ve always had that, and this seemed like a great combination to raise money for a great cause, get into shape, and have my one chance to be in the ring.”

The cause, Long Island Fight for Charity, will be celebrating its 10th anniversary on November 25th, raising money for various local charities, and with the effects of Hurricane Sandy still being felt around the area, it’s important for Haltman and his fellow boxers (23 at the latest count) to do their part to keep awareness high.

“It’s extremely important,” he said. “Sandy, for those who haven’t been directly affected, is starting to fade from people’s memories. My son and I have done some charity work at one of the houses, pulling up floorboards, cleaning, and that sort of thing, and there’s unbelievable devastation, so I think what this charity does is extremely important.”

There are easier ways to give back than getting punched in the face, but the 53-year-old Haltman isn’t looking for the easy way, so he signed up to fight in November, hitting the Glen Cove Boxing Club to work with Frank Pena.

“He runs the gym to keep kids off the streets,” said Haltman of Pena. “But when I went in there, they treated me like they treat the other guys.”

That means he got put to work right away, quickly finding out that boxing isn’t as easy as it may look on television. So when asked if he gained a deeper appreciation of the sport after a few days in the thick of it, he responded without hesitation, “A hundred percent. If you want to be good, it’s a seven day a week deal. You have to make a real commitment and it’s a life change.”

Slowly but surely though, Haltman is starting to pick things up, saying “the difference is amazing” when comparing himself now to when he first stepped into the gym. He is a work in progress though.

“You hit and you’re supposed to move – jab and move or jab and duck,” he said. “It’s almost like dancing, and I’m not a very good dancer. (Laughs) I don’t really have a big problem punching, but learning the moves is the toughest thing.”

He has gotten some good advice from a fellow New Yorker who knows a thing or two about the sport.

“I talked to Gerry Cooney and he said it doesn’t matter how short a round is and if it’s for charity; when you get into a ring, your heart’s pounding, you get tired, and you’re anxious, so you’ve got to get in the ring and spar and get in shape.”

Haltman admits that his wife of 25 years and their three kids weren’t too thrilled about the idea of him stepping into the ring, but he’s not about to be deterred from doing something only a select few can say they did.

“My first goal is to go in there and not look like a fool,” he laughs. “My second one is that I’d like to be competitive. I’d like to actually fight and I want a tough guy.”

Sounds like a fighter already. And truth be told, he can’t wait.

“When I think about it,” he said. “My heart starts pounding.”

From BoxingScene.com

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foreclosure, Title Insurance New York

The Foreclosure Process: What a difference a state makes!

US foreclosure statistics

Does it matter whether a property foreclosure is being pursued within a judicial state or a non-judicial state? You bet it does!

For those who may be unfamiliar with the difference between judicial and non-judicial foreclosures, the short answer has much to do with time. Lots and lots of time.  And, as we say in the business, time is money!

Here are the descriptions for both the judicial and non-judicial foreclosure process provided by the Mortgage Bankers Association:

Judicial Foreclosures

A judicial foreclosure is a court proceeding that begins when the lender files a complaint and records a notice in the public land records announcing a claim on the property to potential buyers, creditors and other interested parties. The complaint describes the debt, the borrower’s default and the amount owed. The complaint asks the court to allow the lender to foreclose its lien and take possession of the property as a remedy for non-payment.

Non-Judicial Foreclosures

The requirements for non-judicial foreclosure are established by state statute; there is no court intervention. When the default occurs, the homeowner is mailed a default letter and in many states a Notice of Default is recorded, at or about the same time. The homeowner may cure the debt during a prescribed period; if not, a Notice of Sale is mailed to the homeowner, posted in public places, recorded at the county’s recorder’s office, and published in area newspapers/legal publications. When the legally required notice period (determined by each state) has expired, a public auction is held and the highest bidder becomes the owner of the property, subject to recordation of the deed. Prior to the sale, if the borrower disagrees with the facts of the case, he or she can try to file a lawsuit to enjoin the trustee’s sale. (Source)

Tale of the Time and National Foreclosure Statistical Overview!

In the first quarter of 2013 the average length of time to go through the foreclosure process in the State of New York, a judicial state, was 1,049 days.

Alternatively in California, a non-judicial state, the average amount of time to foreclose for a $450,000 home is a little over 500 days.

national foreclosure statistics

Click to make bigger

To examine the per state foreclosure statistics as well as other foreclosure metrics please read a great analysis provided in the CoreLogic National Foreclosure Report, April 2013 here.

***Property Tax Grievance in Long Island, New York*** – Testimonial

If you live in either Nassau or Suffolk County in Long Island, New York and would like to grieve your property taxes, one viable option is to do it on your own.

While it’s perfectly fine to do it that way, I used a professional who knew the ins and outs of the process and how to get it done well and most importantly right!

In most cases the amount you may ultimately save will likely more than justify any fee you might have to pay. And you only pay if your property taxes are successfully lowered.

From personal experience I give our highest recommendation to the Real Estate Assessment Group that recently reduced my property tax liability over $3,000. Visit the website here or email Mark Davella at mdavella01@gmail.com.

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At Hallmark Abstract Service our pledge to clients is to make each and every interaction and transaction with our firm as seamless, painless and productive as it can be.

We accomplish this through the level of service we provide, the attention directed to every detail of a transaction, our quick turnaround times and finally through our extremely conservative pricing on non-policy related fees. These are just some of the things that our clients have come to expect from us!

And that’s why we continue to earn their business, time and time again!

Call or email us today to set-up an appointment and we will come to your office, learn about the nuances of your practice and explain to you the way that we approach ours!

Hallmark Abstract Service LLC

Michael Haltman, President

131 Jericho Turnpike, Suite 205

Jericho, New York 11753

516.741.4723 (O)

516.741.6838 (F)

Email:       mhaltman@hallmarkabstractllc.com

Website:   Hallmark Abstract Service

Blog:         The Hallmark Abstract Sentinel

LinkedIn:  Visit my Profile here

At Hallmark Abstract Service, we work harder to make your closings easier!

Hallmark Abstract Service is an agent for Chicago Title Insurance Company!

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Title Insurance New York

Memorial Day 2013

 
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Memorial Day 2013

Please join with Hallmark Abstract Service as we honor the men and women in the military who have made the ultimate sacrifice protecting our American way of life!

Have a happy and safe Memorial Day weekend!

Hallmark Abstract Service, LLC131 Jericho Turnpike, Suite 205Jericho, NY 11753 Hallmark Abstract Service LLC. Phone: 516.741.4723Fax: 516.741.6838orders@hallmarkabstractllc.com
© Copyright 2011 Hallmark Abstract LLC
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Corporate philanthropy, Long Island Fight for Charity, Title Insurance New York

LIFFC: The first ‘Preliminary Event’ was a huge success!

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LIFFC Chateau Briand 2

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Our friends from Resorts World Casino!

Hallmark Abstract Service of New York is participating in the ultimate Charity-Business win-win proposition!

And your business can as well combining philanthropy with marketing and promotion by getting involved with the Long Island Fight for Charity!

Join Long Island, regional and national firms like Resorts World Casino, Viana Hotel and Spa, The Andrew Hotel, Sazerac Spirits, Jewel Restaurant, Atlantis Casino Resort and Spa (Reno) and many more as they participate as sponsors and donors in this, the 10th Anniversary Edition of LIFFC.

On May 20, 2013 at the Chateau Briand in Long Island, New York, LIFFC held its first preliminary event that leads up to the ‘Main Event’ on November 25, 2013 that is taking place at the Long Island Hilton with an expected 1,500 spectators and businesspeople to be in attendance. Last night the turnout was in the vicinity of 300 along with members of the media.

All of the current sponsors were honored on stage and many of the donors and their products were highlighted as well.

Get your company involved by donating products you would like to highlight in one of the silent silent auctions or raffles or by participating as a sponsor receiving constant promotion for your business at an extremely affordable cost with all proceeds benefiting charity.

These are the benefiting charities and the available sponsorships. If you would like to learn more and discuss the possibilities contact boxer and fundraiser Mike Haltman, President of Hallmark Abstract Service using his phone number and email address below.

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Hallmark Abstract Service LLC

Michael Haltman, President

131 Jericho Turnpike, Suite 205

Jericho, New York 11753

516.741.4723 (O)

516.741.6838 (F)

Email:       mhaltman@hallmarkabstractllc.com

Website:   Hallmark Abstract Service

Blog:         The Hallmark Abstract Sentinel

LinkedIn:  Visit my Profile here

At Hallmark Abstract Service, we work harder to make your closings easier!

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Real estate industry, Real estate survey, Title Insurance New York

Real estate broker income soars!

Real estate broker record income

There are any number of explanations for the fact that real estate brokers are earning at a rate not seen for quite some time!

An improving market, low interest rates and higher selling prices are certainly prominent in the mix.

The following article courtesy of CNBC explains it all in detail.

‘The Other Housing Recovery: Agents’ Pay’

More home sales and higher home prices are adding up to bigger incomes for local real estate agents. With approximately two million actively licensed agents in the United States, that is a welcome relief for a workforce that was decimated by the housing crash.

The median gross income of a realtor (a member of the National Association of Realtors) jumped 25 percent in 2012 from the previous year, according to a new NAR survey.

About half of all licensed agents are members of this industry group, which is meeting in Washington, DC this week for a semi-annual conference.

“To put that in perspective,the median realtor income had fallen by 35 percent during the housing downturn, but with the help of sustained increases in both home sales and prices, it’s recovered to the highest level since 2006,” says Paul Bishop, NAR’s vice president of research.

The median gross income of a realtor in 2012 was $43,500, a far cry from the peak of $52,200 in 2002, but the biggest annual gain in over a decade.

“Interestingly, the peak wasn’t during the bubble years, because there were way too many people in the business,” notes NAR president Gary Thomas, a California-based Realtor.

The real estate business is unique, in that most come to the field after other careers, or as a side-business to other jobs. Just six percent of agents now report real estate as their first career.

No surprise then, that the typical age of a realtor is 57; just two percent of them are under 30 — which given the crash is not surprising. 25 percent of realtors are over aged 65.

“I have not seen new people being drawn to the business, but I am seeing agents change firms in pursuit of better split agreements,” says Rick Ambrose, a real estate agent in Morristown, New Jersey. “Quite a few realtors have left the business or become ‘referral agents,’ so they could maintain their license while doing something else.”

With incomes rising, many will likely return to the business. While online real estate sites are gaining traction by the moment, most buyers and sellers, around 89 percent according to the NAR, still use a real estate agent to navigate the process.

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At Hallmark Abstract Service our pledge to clients is to make each and every interaction and transaction with our firm as seamless, painless and productive as it can be.

We accomplish this through the level of service we provide, the attention directed to every detail of a transaction, our quick turnaround times and finally through our extremely conservative pricing on non-policy related fees. These are just some of the things that our clients have come to expect from us!

And that’s why we continue to earn their business, time and time again!

Call or email us today to set-up an appointment and we will come to your office, learn about the nuances of your practice and explain to you the way that we approach ours!

Hallmark Abstract Service LLC

Michael Haltman, President

131 Jericho Turnpike, Suite 205

Jericho, New York 11753

516.741.4723 (O)

516.741.6838 (F)

Email:       mhaltman@hallmarkabstractllc.com

Website:   Hallmark Abstract Service

Blog:         The Hallmark Abstract Sentinel

LinkedIn:  Visit my Profile here

At Hallmark Abstract Service, we work harder to make your closings easier!

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home prices, real estate market, Title Insurance New York

The 2013 Top 10 hottest U.S. housing markets!

2013 Top 10 US housing markets

2013 Top 10 US housing markets

From worst to first!

If one thing stands out from this list of the Top 10 hottest U.S. housing markets in 2013, it’s that many of this years best performers were some of the hardest hit during the financial and real estate market crisis that began in 2008!

1. Phoenix

Change in home value: 24.0%

Current home value: $165,600

Bottom in home value: Q3 2011

Forecast change in home value: 10.6%

2. Las Vegas

Change in home value: 22.3%

Current home value: $138,800

Bottom in home value: Q1 2012

Forecast change in home value: 7.5%

3. San Jose, Calif.

Change in home value: 22.1%

Current home value: $676,100

Bottom in home value: Q3 2009

Forecast change in home value: 9.7%

4. San Francisco

Change in home value: 21.4%

Current home value: $563,200

Bottom in home value: Q1 2012

Forecast change in home value: 10.5%

5. Sacramento, Calif.

Change in home value: 20.1%

Current home value: $241,600

Bottom in home value: Q1 2012

Forecast change in home value: 15.6%

6. San Diego

Change in home value: 17.1%

Current home value: $396,800

Bottom in home value: Q1 2012

Forecast change in home value: 8.8%

7. Riverside, Calif.

Change in home value: 16.3%

Current home value: $210,100

Bottom in home value: Q1 2012

Forecast change in home value: 17.2%

8. Los Angeles

Change in home value: 14.9%

Current home value: $439,400

Bottom in home value: Q1 2012

Forecast change in home value: 11.1%

9. Detroit

Change in home value: 13.1%

Current home value: $84,700

Bottom in home value: Q3 2011

Forecast change in home value: 4.4%

10. Denver

Change in home value: 13.1%

Current home value: $234,200

Bottom in home value: Q2 2011

Forecast change in home value: 3.1%

Source

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At Hallmark Abstract Service our pledge to clients is to make each and every interaction and transaction with our firm as seamless, painless and productive as it can be.

We accomplish this through the level of service we provide, the attention directed to every detail of a transaction, our quick turnaround times and finally through our extremely conservative pricing on non-policy related fees. These are just some of the things that our clients have come to expect from us!

And that’s why we continue to earn their business, time and time again!

Call or email us today to set-up an appointment and we will come to your office, learn about the nuances of your practice and explain to you the way that we approach ours!

Hallmark Abstract Service LLC

Michael Haltman, President

131 Jericho Turnpike, Suite 205

Jericho, New York 11753

516.741.4723 (O)

516.741.6838 (F)

Email:       mhaltman@hallmarkabstractllc.com

Website:   Hallmark Abstract Service

Blog:         The Hallmark Abstract Sentinel

LinkedIn:  Visit my Profile here

At Hallmark Abstract Service, we work harder to make your closings easier!

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business advice, business networking, marketing

Business networking and closing deals on the golf course!

closing deals on the golf course

As summer fast approaches, so to do the opportunities to spend time on the golf course with clients, prospects or with businesspeople who could become either one!

Whether you are a 2 handicap or ‘duffer’, golf presents a fantastic networking opportunity that can be enjoyed regardless of the level of your play.

That is of course if you take care to follow some of the basic rules of etiquette such as not taking 20 minutes to look for a lost ball, always replacing divots, raking sand traps according to club rules and more.

From Forbes, these are the ’19 Tips For Closing A Deal On The Golf Course’:

  • Show up at the course by yourself and you’ll end up in a foursome with people you don’t know. When golfing 18 holes, you will have plenty of time to engage in conversations that will allow you to really get to know the other golfers in a way that LinkedIn and email will never provide.
  • Start the conversations with innocuous topics. Avoid diving into business talk right away. As the rounds progress, you can dig deeper by asking questions that invite the other parties to share information about themselves and their work. Listen carefully to gain a perspective of the problems and bottlenecks they face. Think of how you could help. You could offer an introduction to a contact, or steer them to helpful industry information. More often than not, people will return the favor and help you out down the road.
  • Come to the course with a few business cards to exchange before the end of the round. Follow up by scheduling a lunch, or at the very least, be sure to connect on LinkedIn. (source: Dave Handmaker, Next Day Flyers CEO)
  • Never cheat. “If a person cheats at golf, I don’t think I could trust them as a source I’d refer my clients to,” says John B. Palley, Attorney at Law. “I remember one partner in particular. He went through a dozen balls without ever taking a penalty stroke on that day. On one hole, he clearly lost his ball deep in the rough but all of a sudden he ‘found’ it right on the edge of the fairway. I walked 20 feet and pointed to his original ball (with his company logo on it). He said, ‘Ohhhh, that must be the one I lost the last time I played.’ I am an estate planning attorney and could have referred business to that guy, but I never did.”
  • Be on time! If you’ve invited clients to join you, please give yourself an adequate window of time to arrive at the club before your guests get there.
  • Don’t be too competitive. The emphasis in a business golf setting should be on building rapport and trust with your playing partners.
  • Should you or shouldn’t you have a friendly wager? Wagering is integral to golf, and is a good way to build camaraderie. Accept and embrace it. Keep it the wager friendly and the stakes low. The most common side bets include the Nassaus (3 bets for the round—the low score on the front 9, on the back 9 and on the full 18 at $2 each). Make sure you settle your bets at the end of the round.
  • Don’t make excuses for your game. It’s important for you to know the etiquette of the game. If you are a new player and are with more experienced golfers, please say, “I’m new to the game and I welcome any tips you have to help me move along more quickly.” (source: Pam Swensen, the CEO of the EWGA)
  • Control your anger (don’t curse, throw clubs, etc.)
  • Remember to compliment your prospective client on good shots and putts.
  • If you have logo golf balls from your company, be sure to offer a sleeve or a box to your client before teeing off.
  • Assuming you know the course, be sure to offer pointers on the areas to avoid on each hole. (source: Tom Balcom, Founder of 1650 Wealth Management)
  • Structure the outing so you have time for lunch or a happy hour visit after the game. This time affords a better opportunity to discuss business, life, or changes at work. If the prospective client is a genuinely nice and generous person, it will be apparent. And if they are not? That will become apparent as well.
  • Be on your best behavior. One expert notes that he has played with people he regarded highly until they played golf. And, conversely, he’s played golf with people he didn’t care for but gained a high regard for when they played. “Golf is the most revealing activity,” he said. “Your true personality is going to come out. Are you a cheater? Or an honest, generous person? Do you curse and throw your clubs?” The behavior you can get away with among friends is not going to fly when you’re on the course with clients.
  • Take it easy on the alcohol. When I speak at business lunches or dinners, the subject of alcohol invariably comes up. The key is to take it easy–you always want to remain in control. When it’s hot and you’re drinking alcohol, it’s surprisingly easy to get drunk very quickly. When you are drunk, it’s easy to say or do the wrong thing. You should be a great host and offer your client a beverage when the bar cart comes around. But be sure you alternate between water and alcohol if you are both drinking. Furthermore, if your client is not having beer or alcohol, don’t drink! If you’ve ever been sober around people who are drinking, you’ve seen firsthand how sloppy drinkers can become. Your policy should be “follow the leader” where drinking is concerned. (source: Robin Jay, Writer/Producer: “The Keeper of the Keys”)
  • Treat everyone you come in contact with like gold. Even if someone really upsets you, you can address the situation with a smile and without getting loud. When clients see how you handle yourself under pressure, it will go a long way. Treating the employees at the course well will be an indication of your favorable character as well. (source :RJ Muto, Russell Insurance Group.)
  • Pick a course you will both enjoy, but do your homework. Has the course just aerated the greens? Not a good choice. The same goes for major construction on the clubhouse or facilities. You don’t have to find a course on the level of the Atlanta Athletic Club or Pebble Beach, but you should avoid any course that is in poor condition and under repair.
  • Let your client choose which tees to play from. The experience should be about providing your guests with an enjoyable time and challenge; not about looking out for yourself. You should be prepared to play to the comfort level of your companions and guests.
  • Respect the etiquette of the game by repairing divots on the course, ball marks on the greens, and raking bunkers, if needed. These are the small details that clients will notice because they demonstrate respect for both the course and the golfers behind you. Stand away from fellow players and out of their sight lines when they are playing a shot. A moving shadow during a swing can be an unwelcome distraction. And by all means, be quiet during the swings of others. (source: Dr. William Jankel Dean of Strayer University)

Read the Full Article here.

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